An Account of James Monroe's Land Holdings



© Copyright and All Rights Reserved
By Christopher Fennell



IX. Sources and References Cited


Albemarle County Circuit Court, Office of the Clerk
Deed Books, Order Books, Survey Books, and Will Books. Charlottesville, Virginia.

Ammon, Harry
James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company. 1971.

Correspondence and other records of James Monroe
  • Feb. 15, 1789 Letter from James Monroe to Thomas Jefferson, quoted in Gawalt 1993: 255.

  • June 15, 1789 Letter from James Monroe to James Madison, quoted in Rawlings 1952: 30.

  • August 12, 1789 Letter from James Monroe to James Madison, quoted in Rawlings 1952: 30.

  • Nov. 22, 1789 Letter from James Monroe to James Madison, quoted in Rawlings 1952: 33; Gawalt 1993: 255.

  • Aug. 15, 1800 Insurance Declaration No. 386, quoted in Rawlings 1952: 35.

  • Aug. 15, 1800 Insurance Declaration, No. 388, quoted in Rawlings 1952: 31.

  • July 13, 1809 Insurance Policy No. 1238, quoted in Rawlings 1952: 36.

  • July 25, 1814 Letter from James Monroe to Thomas Jefferson, quoted in Rawlings 1952: 37.

  • Nov. 9, 1816 Insurance Policy No. 2270, quoted in Rawlings 1952: 37.

  • June 27, 1820 Letter from Thomas Jefferson to Pres. James Monroe, copy available in the Virginia Historical Society collections (Mss2 J3595a4).

  • January 13, 1821 Letter from James Monroe to William Benton, quoted in Hellman 1997b: 50.

  • March 11, 1823 Letter from James Monroe to Fulwar Skipwith, quoted in Cunningham 1996: 181.

  • June 5, 1823 Letter from James Monroe to Samuel L. Gouverneur, quoted in Cunningham 1996: 181.

  • The Richmond Enquirer, May 17, 1825, quoted in Cunningham 1996: 228 n.33.

  • Oct. 26, 1826 Letter from James Lewis to James Monroe, quoted in Rawlings 1952: 31.

Cunningham, Noble E., Jr.
The Presidency of James Monroe. Kansas: University of Kansas Press. 1996.

Gawalt, Gerard W.
James Monroe, Presidential Planter. In The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 101, No. 2, pp. 249-72, April, 1993.

Harris, Hunt and Teel Tiller
Monroe Law Office: Limestone Plantation. Studies in Vernacular Architecture No. 37, University of Virginia, School of Architecture, 1977.

Head, James W.
History and Comprehensive Decsription of Loudoun County, Virginia. Leesburg, Virginia: Park View Press, 1908.

Hellman, Susan Holway
Oak Hill: James Monroe's Loudoun Seat. Master's Thesis, School of Architecture, University of Virginia. Charlottesville: University of Virginia, 1997a.

Hellman, Susan Holway
Oak Hill: James Monroe's Home in Loudoun. In The Bulletin of the Historical Society of Loudoun County, Virginia, Second Series, Vol. 1, 1997b, pp. 47-64.

Hughes, Sarah S.
Surveyors and Statesmen: Land Measuring in Colonial Virginia. Richmond: The Virginia Surveyors Foundation, Ltd., 1979.

Jones, Newton B.
Albemarle's Support of the Claims of James Monroe, 1828-1829. In Papers of the Albemarle County Historical Society, Vol. XI, 1951, pp. 45-46.

MacCullough, Glenn and Stuart N. Siegel
Ash Lawn (The Highlands). Studies in Vernacular Architecture No. 51, University of Virginia, School of Architecture, 1979.

Morgan, Elizabeth
Architectural Survey of Oak Hill Plantation, Loudoun County, Virginia. Works Progress Administration, Virginia Historical Inventory, 1937. Available from Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Oliver, Elizabeth
Monroe Hill Law Office. Studies in Vernacular Architecture No. 59, University of Virginia, School of Architecture, 1981.

O'Neal, William B.
Pictorial History of the University of Virginia. Charlottesville: University Press. 1968.

Rawlings, Mary
Mr. Monroe, and Albemarle. In Tyler's Quarterly, Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 29-42, 1952.

Virginia Advocate. July 26, 1828; Nov. 8, 1828, Vol. II, No. 16, p. 3, col. 1; Nov. 8, 1828, Vol. II, No. 16, p. 4, col. 4.

Wilson, Samuel M.
Catalogue of Revolutionary Soldiers and Sailors of the Commonwealth of Virginia to Whom Land Bounty Warrants Were Granted by Virginia Military Services in the War of Independence. Baltimore: Southern Book Company, 1953.

Woods, Edgar
Albemarle County in Virginia. Charlottesville, Virginia: The Michie Company. 1901.




To view a particular topic on Monroe's land holdings,
click on the desired subject below
:

1. The Ash Lawn-Highland plantation
2. Monroe Hill, site of the University of Virginia
3. Parcels in Downtown Charlottesville
4. The Limestone Farm in Albemarle
5. The Oak Hill plantation in Loudoun County
6. A residence in Fredericksburg
7. A residence and land in Henrico County
8. Other speculative land holdings in Kentucky and elsewhere
9. A List of Sources and References Cited

Links to Other Web Sites Concerning Monroe

diamond James Monroe: Fifth President (1817-1825)
diamond Elizabeth Kortright Monroe
diamond American Presidents, Life Portraits
diamond Internet Public Library Portrait
diamond Yale University's Avalon Project: Monroe Papers
diamond History and Geography of Virginia


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Last Modified: Nov. 21, 2020